Engine Fasteners: An In-Depth Look at What Keeps Your Car Together

Bolts, nuts, and washers: They’re what keeps your engine, drivetrain, chassis—heck, the entire car—together. Fasteners are the linchpin for a successful build—but how much attention do you really pay to them? Sure, we want our nuts and bolts to look pretty and not rust, but they’re much more than just another pretty face! Failure of a single critical engine or chassis fastener can cost you tens of thousands of bucks, due to a destroyed engine, or even an entire car. Yet with proper selection and installation practices, you can virtually eliminate fastener failure. Over the next few months, we’re going to take a granular look at today’s fastener technology with the help of Chris Raschke and the Automotive Racing Products (ARP) crew. Unless you’ve been living in a cave the last 20 years, you know that the good folks at ARP have risen to become the dominant force in supplying bulletproof fasteners for just about every hot rod and motorsport application. In this installment, we’ll look at fasteners retained primarily in tension, concentrating on those used to hold your engine together. What are their unique materials and characteristics, how are they made, and how do you properly in...

Jonas Swarttouw, left, NewCold Business development manager, talks during a media tour of the new facility

Jonas Swarttouw, left, NewCold Business development manager, talks during a media tour of the new facility on Sept. 30. Jonas Swarttouw, left, NewCold Business development manager, talks during a media tour of the new facility on Sept. 30. BURLEY, Idaho — NewCold, one of the largest cold-storage facilities in the U.S., celebrated its grand opening this week. Based in the Netherlands, the company built the 180,000-square-foot facility to serve the needs of McCain Foods — the world’s largest manufacturer of frozen french fries and potato products. The partnership with McCain was key to the project, Jonas Sarttouw, NewCold business development manager, said. The $90 million facility can store 90,000 pallets of frozen product in a high-bay warehouse at 5 degrees below zero. Most of the operation is fully automated, moving and storing product in a massive system of racks 140 feet tall. Conveyors can unload a semi-trailer in 3 to 4 minutes, and every item received is tagged into the system, Derek Bedke, NewCold site manager, said. Products are transported to the high-bay warehouse on chain conveyors and stacked by automated cranes. The warehouse is dark to conserve energy, and oxygen...

Casting super strong metals with grain sizes down to nanometers during slow cooling. The study was

Casting super strong metals with grain sizes down to nanometers during slow cooling. The study was published in Science Advances For several years, Professor Xiaochun Li has been incorporating dense nanoparticles to make materials stronger and tougher – for example lightweight aluminum alloys and more recently, glass and ceramics. But those enhancing qualities take effect when the material is in its final form. Li started to wonder, “what if nanoparticles could help make super strong metals, during the actual formation?” That is during casting, when they solidify from a hot molten liquid in a mold. That could be a major breakthrough in the casting of metals, a process that is thousands of years old. At the atomic level, atoms of metals group together to form crystal lattices. Those lattices then form units are known as crystalline “grains.” “A grain is kind of like a little family of atoms that are ordered in lattice structure,” Li said. “Metals in their solid form are made up of these many families – each grain has its atomic lattice oriented in one direction, while its neighbors will be ordered in other directions.” “The smaller the grain sizes, the stronger a metal gets,” Li...

Garmin Vivosmart 4 review: An affordable band for easy fitness, SpO2 data

Fitness tech companies, particularly Fitbit and Garmin, want to monitor the level of oxygen in your blood. It’s a metric that could help spot signs of sleep apnea and other breathing-related problems, so companies have been scrambling to perfect their SpO2 sensors and incorporate this data into their ecosystems in a meaningful way. Fitbit still hasn’t activated its SpO2 monitors in its wearables (although that feature should roll out in beta in November), but Garmin has. Its newest fitness tracker, the $129 Vivosmart 4, includes an SpO2 monitor and measures Body Battery, which lets you know when you should plan your next intense workout session and when you should take a rest day. Those two features, in addition to an all-new design and an affordable price, attempt to push the Vivosmart 4 above the rest of the fitness tracker crowd. As we saw with Fitbit’s Charge 3, trackers have fallen into a boredom trap as of late, so companies are trying to find unique ways to capture the attention of potential customers who aren’t fully sold on smartwatches. While Garmin achieves a certain level of differentiation with the Vivosmart 4, it’s unlikely that everyo...

New dhb Aeron Rain Defence range aims to keep you dry in wet conditions

dhb has gone high-tech, launching a completely updated Aeron Rain Defence range of clothing that uses fabrics from Polartec and Schoeller. As the name suggests, the lineup is designed to keep you dry in wet weather conditions, while the use of breathable fabrics means that you shouldn’t get too damp from sweat.  dhb says that as well as offering clothing that’s suitable for a wide range of riding conditions — which it has been doing for years — it is now beginning to design kit for more specific types of weather and circumstances. The Aeron Rain Defence range is one result of that approach. It includes jackets and bib tights for both men and women, along with arm, knee and leg warmers. dhb is also using more fabrics from well-respected brands like Polartec than ever before. The Aeron Rain Defence Polartec Jacket (£130) is made from Polartec’s Power Shield Pro softshell fabric, the idea being to provide resistance to the rain plus warmth and breathability. Polartec says, “By re-engineering [our] dense knit multi-component fabric we developed an even stronger balance between warmth and breathability while drastically increasing the inherent ability t...

Police arrest driver using stolen car to deliver McDonald’s, LBPD says • Long Beach Post News

Subscribe to the Long Beach Post’s daily eALERT and get the best local news in the city delivered to your inbox. Long Beach police say they pulled over a man who’d been using a stolen car to ferry orders for a food-delivery company. He was delivering a bag of McDonald’s in West Long Beach when officers stopped him on the afternoon of Oct. 12 on Santa Fe Avenue near 34th Street, according to the LBPD. Officers arrested the 48-year-old driver, who is from Long Beach. He’s since pleaded no contest to one misdemeanor count of unlawfully taking a vehicle, according to court records. Police didn’t reveal what delivery service the man was working for. “After ensuring the suspect was taken into custody, officers identified the location where the food was going and delivered it to a grateful Long Beach resident,” Dandoy said. Here to protect

Final decision on Edmonton’s calcium chloride program expected Tuesday after 2 weeks of delays

A long-awaited decision on the future of Edmonton’s calcium chloride program is expected on Tuesday, after two weeks of delay on a decision. Councillors were widely expected to decide last Tuesday whether to use the anti-icing agent again this winter. Council had voted seven to six in favour of stopping calcium chloride use for the 2019-2020 season and asking for a report from administration next summer about how to achieve bare pavement without using the controversial solution. Councillors Banga, Dziadyk, McKeen, Esslinger, Cartmell, Paquette and Knack voted to discontinue the solution’s use. But an error from Councillor Tim Cartmell during the final vote meant a re-vote was required. It was then that Mayor Don Iveson said the vote should be postponed to the following Tuesday. If Tuesday’s vote goes through without anyone changing their voting intentions from the week prior, the methods that would be used on city streets this winter would include salt, sand, plowing and grading. “We can’t presuppose what council’s actually going to vote on next Tuesday,” Iveson said on Oct. 1. “Until the final decision is made, I think it’s premature to speculate. Councillor Knack had been sup...

Antimicrobial magnetic bots make short work of biofilms

Thank you for registering with Physics World If you’d like to change your details at any time, please visit My account Magnetic robots could be used to kill, degrade and remove biofilms from a variety of dental and laboratory surfaces. The devices, developed by an interdisciplinary team of researchers at the University of Pennsylvania, may help in the fight against persistent antibiotic-resistant biofilm infections and biofouling of medical equipment. Biofilms are made up of communities of bacterial cells encapsulated in a protective matrix of polymeric substances. They adhere to a variety of surfaces both within the body – where they can cause infections and other complications – or on non-biological structures, such as catheters and implants. Biofilms are complex and mechanically stable scaffolds that can be resistant to antibacterial treatments so removing them is an important challenge – especially as we approach a post-antibiotic era, says Hyun Koo of the School of Dental Medicine, who led this research effort together with Edward Steager of the School of Engineering and Applied Science. The problem is that current antimicrobial techniques are proving to be largely in...

Remodeled midcentury one-bedroom condo for sale $599K in Pasadena

This one-bedroom condo is located in the Villa San Pasqual, a landmarked midcentury complex in Pasadena, between South Lake Avenue’s shopping strip and Caltech. The 959-square-foot upper-level unit features its original hardwood floors and a big section of floor-to-ceilings windows, including sliders that open onto a private balcony. The kitchen has retro-looking cabinets (they’re actually newly built custom pieces) along with a teal tile backsplash and terrazzo floors, which really lean into the 1950s cool of the dwelling. The sole bathroom is spacious with marble floors, mosaic tiles, and the original pink bathtub. Last sold for $485,000 in August and updated since then, the residence at 1000 San Pasqual Avenue, Unit J is now seeking $599,000. Carmine Sabatella and Ryan Delair of Compass have the listing. Bird Sculpture Firefighters are holding the blaze at 4,300 acres. The mayor says it’s a “miracle” that it didn’t grow today amid Santa Ana winds. The Valley is always “crying” about not getting enough transportation projects. “This [is] a way to say we agree,” says Supervisor Sheila Kuehl. Buddha Statue, Stone Bathtub, Marble Fountain, Ston...

Swiss star wins the title in the final race of his third WorldSSP season Randy Krummenacher (BARDAHL

Swiss star wins the title in the final race of his third WorldSSP season Randy Krummenacher (BARDAHL Evan Bros. WorldSSP Team) is the new king of the FIM Supersport World Championship, after holding on to his advantage over teammate Federico Caricasulo and Jules Cluzel (GMT94 YAMAHA) in the final race of the year.The middleweight class thus crowns another German-speaking Champion one year after Sandro Cortese’s fantastic achievement as a rookie. Krummenacher is the first Swiss rider to become World Champion in the World Superbike paddock and only the fourth if adding MotoGP™ (joining Luigi Taveri and Thomas Luthi, 125cc Champions, and Stefan Dörflinger, 50cc and 80cc Champion).2019 was the year that Krummenacher added consistency to his undeniable talent. After promising yet uneven spells in the 125cc World Championship and Moto2™, the man from Zurich landed in WorldSSP with a bang in 2016, winning his first race in the series. It would be his only win that year, but several more promising results gave him the chance to step up to WorldSBK in 2017 alongside Puccetti Racing.Krummenacher was back in WorldSSP for 2018 and, in similar fashion to his rookie season, made another insta...

The 55 inch size category of 4K TVs is one of the most popular among both

The 55 inch size category of 4K TVs is one of the most popular among both consumers and TV manufacturers alike. While many models from the different name brands aren’t released in smaller 50 inch or less dimensions and few 4K TV models reach up to beyond 70 inches, almost every important model of 4K TV on the market from all major brands comes in a 55 inch version. This is the case largely because 55 inches is sort of the “ideal” TV display size for mid-sized TVs, just like 65 inches is the ideal display size for larger TVs. 55 is big enough to appreciate the 4K resolution at a reasonable distance and feel immersed in the onscreen content with the TV’s respectable size while also not being so large that the TV looks odd in a smaller space. 55 inch 4K TVs also tend to have much more reasonable prices for a wider consumer base, even if they’re high-end premium models, as most of those we’re about to cover are. In basic terms, 55 inch TVs could be considered as the electronic equivalent of Goldilock’s proverbial porridge: Not too big, not too small but just right. Factor in all the awesome cutting edge display technologies that start to get included in many 4K HDR TVs in the 55 inc...

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