In my hands rests a copy of an opinion document, not a legal one. That’s an important distinction that some Hall of Fame voters don’t quite seem to grasp. Too many treat it more like a legal form, and rely on hard proof when weighing the issue of steroids. Now I’m putting the ballot on a flat surface, picking up a pen, and doing what I do every year, checking the boxes next to the names of Barry Bonds and Roger Clemens. Many other voters exclude them because overwhelming evidence of their cheating surfaced, yet have no problem voting for obvious steroid abusers never nabbed, never disciplined. So in an effort to bar cheaters, these voters have rewarded those better at cheating and barred those worse at it, even though they were superior ballplayers to the enshrined muscle heads. So in a sense, Cooperstown is home of not only Hall of Fame ballplayers, but Hall of Fame cheaters, an ironic consequence of voters excluding sloppy cheaters and opening the gates to sneakier, more skilled rule breakers. Every year that passes without Bonds, the best hitter of his era, and Clemens, a top-three (inducted duo of Greg Maddux, Randy Johnson) pitcher from the same time period, gaining inducti...