Sen. Bernie Sanders Envisions a Federal Takeover of U.S. Renewable Energy Production

(CNSNews.com) – “Climate change is a global emergency,” Sen. Bernie Sanders declared, and on Thursday, he unveiled a $16.3 TRILLION plan — that’s Trillion with a “T,” to fight climate change. According to Sanders’ campaign website, he aims to reach 100 percent renewable energy for electricity and transportation by no later than 2030 and complete decarbonization by 2050 at latest. He would do this by “expanding the existing federal Power Marketing Administrations to build new solar, wind, and geothermal energy sources.” The four existing federal Power Marketing Administrations (PMAs) include the Bonneville Power Administration; Western Area Power Administration; Southeastern Power Administration; and Southwestern Power Administration. They, along with the Tennessee Valley Administration, operate electric systems and sell the electrical output of federally owned and operated hydroelectric dams in 34 states. Sanders said he will create one more PMA to cover the remaining states and territories — “and expand the existing PMAs to build more than enough wind, solar, energy storage and geothermal power plants.̶...

The Latest Risk in Renewable Energy Investing: Wind Droughts

This was supposed to be a breakout year for American wind power. It’s expected to snatch the crown from hydropower as the nation’s top renewable-energy source — a title hydroelectric dams have held since the days of Thomas Edison — and should end the year with over 100,000 megawatts of installed capacity. But the year is off to a rough start. In the first quarter of 2019, electricity generated from wind power declined 5% compared to the year-ago period, despite an 8.5% increase in installed capacity in that span. Many major industry players were able to offset the declines by bringing new projects online, but investors strolling through recent filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission might be surprised by the magnitude of the declines from existing assets. The year-over-year comparisons highlight the risk of wind variability to renewable-energy investors. NextEra Energy Partners (NYSE: NEP) reported a year-over-year revenue decline of 16%, or $35 million, in the first quarter of 2019. If you exclude divested Canadian assets from the comparison, then revenue actually increased by $11 million. But it could have been even better. The renewable-ene...